LIVING LIFE ONE STORY AT A TIME

INTRODUCING GUEST BLOGGER AND FELLOW BOOKPRENEUR-PAULINE MANSFIELD as she shares her experiences “Living Life One Story at a Time.”

Twenty years ago, I never imagined that I would ever call myself a writer; the first time I said those words out loud, “I am a writer,” it was a very weird feeling because it took a while for me to really to believe that I was worthy of claiming that title. Now I am living my life – one story at a time as a writer, and I am loving it!

We all have hundreds of stories hidden within us, waiting to be written and then shared with the universe. For the past three years, it has been a joy for me to help others to carve out those stories like a sculptor carves images out of a piece of clay. Like a sculptor, each of us, as writers, must connect first with our souls to pull out the images we want to create in any book we finally make the decision to write.

I remember how absurd and impossible it seemed to me to even start a journey to tell my story. When a dear friend suggested that I share my life challenges to help others in my very first book, “The Turtle Story – 7 Steps to Breaking Free from Domestic Violence”, I was very reluctant to start that journey down this unknown road. This journey wasn’t easy, but I acquiesced, and since then, I have never looked back. It took me several years to build the confidence to put those first words on paper. I had to move past the discomfort of asking others to help me through the process of turning mere words scribbled on pieces of paper over many years into a book worthy of being published, then shared with the world.

As a writing coach and developmental editor, I now guide others to reach their destiny as confident and joyful writers. Like anything that we are passionate about, writing your story should be joyful. It does not matter if you are creating a murder mystery, a love story based on lives you have touched along your life’s journey, a self-help book, or a biography about someone you know and love. What matters is that you always write with passion and clarity, as if holding a paintbrush on a canvas or a chisel in hand to bring life and form to a chunk of wood or marble.

We, as writers, must see ourselves as artists with a gift given to us by God. We are charged to enlighten, uplift, inspire and bring joy through our fingers just like other artists with their own gifts. Our gifts are already buried in our souls, we must just recognize it, accept it and release it out to the world.

So, say it loud and say it proud – “I AM AN ARTIST – WATCH ME WRITE!”

Writing is her passion and Pauline Mansfield translates that passion into life stories. Pauline says that she writes books to educate, to enlighten, and to empower those suffering from broken spirits.  She has created from her experiences four inspiring books. In addition to being an author, Pauline is a public speaker and community volunteer. She currently chairs the COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD for the GRADY HOSPITAL NIA PROJECT, a non-profit organization devoted to positively changing the lives of men and women – one life at a time.


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The World is Full of Cousins

This world is filled with cousins, not just for me. Although, I admit I may be unique. You see, I have over 50 first cousins. Add to that, I can’t even count the number of others that are designated cousin in the relative tree. On my maternal side, my grandparents had over 20 siblings, and on my paternal side, my grandparents had at least 10 that I am aware of. So, start multiplying those aunts and uncles’ offspring and their offspring, as well as the offspring of my 50 first cousins and their offspring. If you brought us all together by my bloodline alone, we could build a city. Do I know all of them? Of course not, but I am proud to say that I knew all 50 plus first cousins. Some have passed on much too early. But, out of the ones left, some were as close as if they were my own siblings, others I vacationed with and got to know them that way, others I didn’t get to know until we were adults, but all of them I know personally and love. Thanks to Facebook and occasional family reunions, I know a few of their extensions, and in other cases, I know their offspring well. That’s why it was so exciting to have all three of my grandchildren together this past week. They were getting to know each other better, creating memories that will last a lifetime. Watching them connect made me consider our connections beyond our bloodlines, and it hit me. We, humanity, are all cousins to some extent.

To take that thought a little further, all of creation is related in some manner. We are made of the same substances, the same energy as plant life, animal life, and the soil and rocks beneath our feet. We were all created by the same Universal source, whether you refer to It as God or the Universe or your cultural name for either. One thought created this world and all that is in it, so that thought, that God is the parent of all that exists. If we came from one parent, then we are definitely brothers and sisters and whatever we create makes our offspring, our creations, cousins. When mankind finally realizes we are one family exhibiting a variety of uniqueness that contributes to the betterment of us all, we will accept each other as family living in a world full of cousins.

Dilsa Saunders Bailey is an independent author who has not only self-published three novels and a non-fiction book; she has spent most of her medical services career writing policies, bylaws, operations manuals, and more over the last 27 years. Dilsa is now coaching writers through the self-publishing journey and helping them to set up their businesses using their books as a marketing tool to build their platforms. If you want to learn more about how she can help you, contact her at dilsa@simplydilsa.com or join her blog below to keep up to date with her books and seminars.

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Our World, Our Stories

Humans love stories.  We exist in stories. 

TheSperlingChroniclesBanner-FINALHumans love stories.  We exist in stories.  That is why the great teachers like Buddha and Jesus are still revered by the masses. They taught through storytelling, vivid parables and examples of how life should be lived. Their stories resonate within our souls. Stories. They are timeless and are continually seeding our minds with worry or hope or faith, dependent on your life’s situation.

Think about it. You are always telling yourself or someone else a story. Other people are always telling you a story as well. For instance, people listen to the office gossiper because that person is so good at relating a story, even if it’s detrimental. How do you think President Obama was elected or even Trump?  President Obama seeded us with stories and visions of a better progressive world. Trump planted the world with stories of fear. He had his followers envisioning the past as the good old days. Let’s face it, there is never a time when we are not amid a storyline, one that has happened, one we are creating, one that we are planning, or one that we are fantasizing about. Isn’t this why we have become a society of television watchers. We are hooked on stories. I admit I am a binge-watcher. There are only a few shows that I worry about seeing as they air anymore. I’d rather watch the whole season at once for the story. I want the entire story from beginning to end, like reading a book or a series of books. I must have it all.

As a writer who loves to read books for stories as much as she likes to watch television, I know the value of all stories is the word. The words that tell the stories evoke emotion and possible action. What words are creating your stories today?

Dilsa Saunders Bailey is an independent author who has not only self-published three novels and a non-fiction book; she has spent most of her medical services career writing policies, bylaws, operations manuals, and more over the last 27 years. Dilsa is now coaching writers through the self-publishing journey and helping them to set up their businesses using their books as a marketing tool to build their platforms. If you want to learn more about how she can help you, contact her at dilsa@simplydilsa.com or join her blog below to keep up to date with her books and seminars.

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The Increased Value of Networking

Reach out and touch. Networking is more than your net worth, it’s the connection that is worth much more.

Global Business - Chadive Raja ReddyHave you heard the adage about networking? It goes something like this, “your network equals your net worth.” A friend of mine, the great speaker, Richard Hardon, can easily motivate you to reach out to others to help you succeed to greater heights using that phrase. Without a doubt, he is right about that. But, I get something else from what he teaches, too. I understand that networking is something even more valuable than your net worth or its ability to open doors to increase your income. I get that networking is important because it allows you to connect in so many ways. For instance, during networking, you realize more intimately that you are not alone in your endeavors or your struggles.
For instance, a few months ago I was asked to share some self-publishing advice with a writers’ group in South Atlanta. If you are on the southside and want to join this vibrant group, they are called The Turtle Queen Author’s Club. The Turtle Queen is Pauline Mansfield who has written several books, two of which on how she survived domestic abuse. Ms. Pauline is a very charming woman whose heart is the source of her network. She hasn’t met a person that doesn’t instantly fall in love with her. Many of the writers in her group had been published traditionally and self-published, and many were seeking insight on the mechanics of writing and publishing. But, it was a sharing event that increased the value of their minds and spirits. Mine, too.
Fast forward to two weeks ago when I attended a book club in midtown. I found it on Meetup and since it was sponsored by the Black Lit Society, a very active organization founded by author Tamika Newhouse, I thought I would check it out. Tamika is a young powerhouse. Having authored and published 19 books, she owns a publishing house, a production company, a book club and book review website, and is the founder the African Americans on the Move Book Club (AAMBC) Awards held every year to highlight the achievements of African Americans in the literary world. Tamika attended this event and shared her life’s successes and failures along the way during her exciting career. Again, in attendance were not just readers but writers and aspiring writers looking for that small crumb of motivation to keep at it, not giving up on becoming a writer. Ms. Newhouse was very easy to chat with, very open, and relaxed. I don’t think anyone walked away without some form of encouragement. What I walked away with though was something more than the networking value of hearing and seeing someone else’s success, but in comparison where I had not succeeded. I won’t use the word failure, because that I did not do that overall, fail. But, I didn’t succeed in moving forward with my writing and publishing as she did. And, that had been my dream as it had hers. You see, the lesson I walked away with from her networking event, was not to quit this time. She and I had attended our first ever book conferences in Houston, Texas years ago, exact event. At the time, we both had only one book. Yet, for me after spending hard-earn dollars on several book conferences later, I no longer believed that I was going to make it in the business, so I quit. She didn’t. She kept trying until she got it right. I stayed in my career and kept earning a paycheck. She worked for herself and built her empire.
Yes, networking with the right people will put you in the right position and afford you the right mindset to uplift your income, your net worth. But, overall, it’s those networking eye openers that uplift the soul as well and that net worth is priceless. So writers, get up from your computer, walk into the sunshine, and get into your car. Go meet someone new. Maybe they will increase your value to the Universe.
Dilsa Saunders Bailey, the author of The Sperling Chronicles and A Comprehensive Guide to Finding the Right Doctor, loves to blog as “simplydilsa,” a woman who loves to write out loud. The third novel in The Sperling ChroniclesNo Tears for Dead Men, is now available in Print and on Kindle.

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Three Trash Bags, A Rain Poncho, and a Warm Blanket…How to Survive the Seabreeze Jazz Festival

Partying in the rain can be fun. These ladies learned how to survive the Seabreeze Jazz Festival!

As I sit here listening to Seduction by Boney James, I am reminiscing about my fourth trip to the Seabreeze Jazz Festival. As usual, the lineup was fantastic, Boney James, Brian Culbertson, Eric Darius, and the list goes on and on. If you have never been, you need to put it on your bucket list. It was four full, fabulous days of 29 of the top jazz musicians and R&B artists in the world. Some of which performed so intensely, you could not stay seated in your chairs. Your body demanded that you move with the music. And as always, there is one artist that makes me fall deeply in love with their style, Damien Escobar. I had heard his music before, but his performance was intense. Yep, I was on my feet during most of his show. I would pay to see him again. All of the acts were great; one faltered a little bit. I won’t mention her name, but if you were there, you know what was up. I can only wish whatever she is dealing with; she can overcome.
20180422_144518So what’s up with the trash bags? It seems never to fail; rain wants to attend the show, too. And this year, it didn’t just rain, it was cold. But, my crew of jazz aficionados and I were prepared. Thought I would share some of the tricks. If you are sports fans or regular music fest folks, you probably have a set of tools you already use. But, these I find irreplaceable. Yep, trash bags, the large black or green ones. I say take three. Here’s what to do with them. Put one on the back of your chair. Tie it down. It got windy out there Sunday. The rain was blowing sideways. It wasn’t playing. Put the second bag on the seat of your chair. Yes, chair. At the jazz fest, we had chairs. It’s easier to rent than to lug, but you can carry a little canvas in a bag. It’s up to you. Don’t forget your blanket for the cooler nights and days. The rain and the chill will try to sneak in and try to disrupt your good time.
What do with the third bag? Well, this is key. Wrap your blanket around you, pull your poncho over your head and put your legs in the third bag. Yep. You are thoroughly covered and waterproof. Sit back, bounce in your seat, tell the rain and the chill that you are not paying them any attention. It’s all about the music and the beautiful energy that is so obvious throughout the crowd. I wish all venues were as peaceful and soothing as a jazz festival. Everybody there is just there to groove, relax to the sounds of the soulful instruments played by artists who put their entire soul into every note. You can almost see their spirits traveling around touching each and every one in the audience. There is nothing like it. This year marked the 20th Anniversary of the Seabreeze Jazz Festival. Kudos to the producers. My crew and I will be back next year. Rain, shine, or wind chill.
Dilsa Saunders Bailey, the author of The Sperling Chronicles and A Comprehensive Guide to Finding the Right Doctor, loves to blog as “simplydilsa,” a woman who loves to write out loud. The third novel in The Sperling Chronicles, No Tears for Dead Men, was released on Amazon May 5, 2018. Buy it Now.

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